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Scots widow makes desperate appeal for return of late husband’s wedding ring she lost two weeks after he died

A heartbroken Scots widow has made a desperate appeal for the return of her late husband’s wedding ring after losing it two weeks on from his death.

Janet Darby visited a jeweller in North Berwick on Friday to have husband Jim’s ring measured for resizing but decided to keep it on her middle finger so she could wear it to his cremation on Monday.

But she realised it was missing later that night and reckons it came off as she rushed about during the day trying to organise the order of service for his funeral after another firm botched the printing job.

Janet told the Record: “My heart is broken and I was organising the order of service and trawling through images, and Friday was not a good day.

“I was really quite distracted on Friday and there was pressure to get to the printers before it closed as this would be the last chance to get it all sorted.

“I did not sleep last night worrying where it was and not having it for tomorrow would not be good. Getting it back would be a relief but getting it back in time for the funeral would be amazing. It would be a perfect send off and without it, something is a bit missing.

“That’s the only jewellery he wore so to have lost it is upsetting.”



The lost wedding ring itself was specially made in the jewellery quarter in Birmingham and Janet has one the same, pictured.
The lost wedding ring itself was specially made in the jewellery quarter in Birmingham and Janet has one the same, pictured.

Jim Darby, who was 83 and had Type 2 diabetes, died as a result of complications from his condition and pneumonia was also listed as a cause of death.

He was admitted to the Western General Hospital in Edinburgh in early August with a bladder infection and stayed there for seven weeks before moving home to be with Janet.

The couple were married for 34 years and lived in North Berwick’s Melbourne Street in the 1990s where they ran a joint practice offering massage physiotherapy and acupuncture. They then spent 20 years in Australia and Singapore before returning to the East Lothian town.

The lost wedding ring itself was specially made in the jewellery quarter in Birmingham and Janet has one the same.

The widow also says she would be more than happy to discuss the possibility of a finder’s fee with anyone who should find the ring.



Janet Darby reckons she lost the ring as she rushed around trying to organise the order of service for her husband's funeral after another printing firm botched the job first time round.
Janet Darby reckons she lost the ring as she rushed around trying to organise the order of service for her husband’s funeral after another printing firm botched the job first time round.

The 59-year-old continued: “It was nice and relaxed in the morning but the order of service arrived and I looked at it and the images were all wrong.

“I was a bit panicked and called a friend in Florida who has been helping me and then spoke to Rock & Bird (printing shop) to arrange for another print.”

After carrying out errands on Friday, Janet drove back from her home, near the Leuchie estate, into North Berwick for a second time but had to park further out on Tantallon Terrace, near the golf club, as the beach area was getting busy with the weather improving.

She rushed along the beach and up past the Hope Rooms building to get to the printing shop, detouring into Turnbull’s again to ask for a face mask amid her panic.



Janet wearing her wedding ring, which is the same as her late husband Jim's.
Janet wearing her wedding ring, which is the same as her late husband Jim’s.

As the printing was being redone, she went back to the Seabird Centre for some late lunch and returned to collect her new prints around 4.40pm.

Janet said: “I remember feeling a bit dishevelled and trying to make sure I did not drop anything. I took some videos and pictures at the beach as it was glorious and the pressure seemed to be off at that point. I was chatting to people on the beach as well.

“It could easily have been lost trying to film the view and I didn’t quite have enough hands and was carrying a poster as well as the bag containing the order of services. I was juggling a few things.”

The couple, who were both keen hill runners and modern pentathletes, met in Tewkesbury in Gloucestershire in the late 1970s when Jim came there to present her with a medal for a third placed finish.

They tied the knot in 1987 at the Tipton Harriers running club in the West Midlands before moving up to Scotland soon after.

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