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Kate Middleton took ‘great comfort’ in playing the piano over lockdown – ‘Very important’ | Royal | News

The Duchess of Cambridge took everyone by surprise by playing piano at the Christmas carol concert surrounded by candles lighting up Westminster Abbey on December 8. During her first public performance, the 39-year-old royal accompanied singer Tom Walker on the keys for his poignant rendition of “For Those Who Can’t Be Here”.

A royal source told People that the plan to perform at the event was initiated by the Duchess of Cambridge who had learned to play the piano as a child.

The sources further said that she has taken “great comfort” in playing music throughout the pandemic.

The source told the publication: “Music was very important to the Duchess during the lockdowns.

“She also recognizes the powerful way in which music brings people together — especially during difficult times.

“For these reasons, she was keen to be part of Tom’s performance in this way.”

Talking about his experience with the royal, Mr Walker said: “She’s such a lovely, kind and warm-hearted person and she took the time to thank everyone personally for the opportunity to play together.

“It was a crazy pinch-yourself kind of day for me, to be in such a beautiful venue playing alongside the Duchess with my band and a string quartet. I certainly won’t forget that in a hurry!”

Kate’s former piano instructor Daniel Nicholls previously opened up to the Evening Standard about teaching the future queen in the 1990s, from the time she was 10 or 11 until 13.

He said: “She was absolutely lovely, a really delightful person to teach the piano.”

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As per the reports, Queen Elizabeth grew up playing piano, and Princess Diana also could play piano tunes.

Prince Charles studied several instruments, but the cello earned him a seat in the Trinity College Orchestra.



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